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People are using phenylethylamine for These 3 Crazy benefits

People use phenylethylamine for a number of great benefits. Its powerful stimulant effects and mood boost are among the top phenylethylamine effects.


Phenylethylamine is a trace amine found in a number of food sources and produced naturally by our bodies. It is made from the amino acid phenylalanine, which is found in high protein foods.[1]


The structure of phenylethylamine is similar to the structure of amphetamines, and it is considered by some to be the body’s natural amphetamine. It’s no wonder then that that powerful substance has gained a strong reputation as one of the best energizing compounds available.

1. Phenylethylamine for weight loss


phenylethylamine helps with weight loss Phenylethylamine, with exercise, helps aid in weight-loss

Phenylethylamine is often found in energy drinks and weight loss supplement stacks. It’s great for producing an energy and mood boost. This seems to be the main reason that PEA is included in these products, along with caffeine, Hordenine and synephrine, among others.[2]


Phenylethylamine is a powerful weight loss supplement. It is found in chocolate and red wine. However, the amount of PEA in chocolate is not enough to produce weight loss effects.[3] This is why chocolate will still cause you to gain weight. The best way to experience the weight loss effects of PEA is to use a supplement.


2. Phenylethylamine for studying and memory


Phenylethylamine helps to increase the levels of catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinephrine) and dopamine in your brain. The catecholamines increase energy, mental stimulation, and focus.[4] Dopamine is great for improving mood and feelings of pleasure.[5]

phenylethylamine for Phenylethylamine helps with studying and ADD


Studies have found that people with ADD and ADHD have lower than normal levels of catecholamines and dopamine.[6] Phenylethylamine increases catecholamine and dopamine levels, and is effective at increasing focus and learning capabilities. It’s a great supplement to aid in studying!


3. Phenylethylamine for improving mood and reducing anxiety


PEA supplements are great for helping with the symptoms of anxiety. Since PEA is so good at increasing natural levels of dopamine, which is one of the ‘feel-good’ hormones, it is great at combatting negative feelings of anxiety.[7]


Low levels of dopamine are known to cause anxiety and depression, along with a number of other mental illnesses. Taking phenylethylamine boosts your dopamine levels.[8] Increased dopamine levels make you feel happier, calmer and more sensual.




You can add phenylethylamine to your stack to help aid in weight-loss. This is a great stack that will boost your energy levels and help power you through a session at gym!


Another great benefit is phenylethylamine for studying. By increasing catecholamines and dopamine, phenylethylamine give a clear focus and energy boost, associated with increases in cognitive power and learning capabilities.

phenylethylamine for Liftmode Phenylethylamine: 99%+ purity


Lastly, phenylethylamine is great for improving your overall mood. The increase in dopamine is highly effective at combatting anxiety and feelings of sadness, while the energy boost makes you want to get up and do something!


We definitely recommend taking a phenylethylamine supplement to improve your mood and energy. Phenylethylamine can be addictive, so we recommend cycling your doses. You can lengthen the effects of phenylethylamine by using PEA with hordenine. If you are on MAOIs or SSRIs, please consult your physician before starting with a phenylethylamine supplement.



top nootropics [1] 2-phenylethylamine, ChEBI.ac.uk, available from

http://www.ebi.ac.uk/chebi/searchId.do?chebiId=CHEBI:18397, retrieved on July 23, 2016

[2] Jay R Hoffman et al, Thermogenic effect of an acute ingestion of a weight loss supplement, J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2009; 6: 1, Published online 2009 Jan 6, available from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2621121/

[3] Pastore P et al, Determination of biogenic amines in chocolate by ion chromatographic separation and pulsed integrated amperometric detection with implemented wave-form at Au disposable electrode, J Chromatogr A. 2005 Dec 9;1098(1-2):111-5. Epub 2005 Sep 8, available from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16314166

[4] Tank AW and Lee Wong D, Peripheral and central effects of circulating catecholamines, Compr Physiol. 2015 Jan;5(1):1-15, available from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25589262

[5] Bressan, R. A. and Crippa, J. A. (2005), The role of dopamine in reward and pleasure behaviour – review of data from preclinical research. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 111: 14–21. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0447.2005.00540.x

[6] Prince J, Catecholamine dysfunction in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: an update, J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2008 Jun;28(3 Suppl 2):S39-45. doi: 10.1097/JCP.0b013e318174f92a, available from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18480676

[7] The Biochemistry of Anxiety, CalmClinic.com, June 17, 2016, available from

http://www.calmclinic.com/anxiety/biochemistry-of-anxiety, retrieved on July 22, 2016

[8] Murata M et al, Effect of beta-phenylethylamine on extracellular concentrations of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and prefrontal cortex, Brain Res. 2009 May 7;1269:40-6. doi: 10.1016, available from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19285043